Head liner rear inside panels

Mikie17

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I have a 69 Oldsmobile delta 88 and there’s no rust under the carpet and installation but there’s rust all on the inside of the car where the weather stripping of the rear window is, also on the ceiling and rear sides of the coupe and even under the trunk. I believe it’s due to the original weather stripping going bad and dried up. So if anyone would know how to fix this it would be much appreciated?
 

Intragration

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If you're talking about the rear window, and not the side rear windows, it could be the rear window channel. I had another 1970 GM car, and over the years, the leaves and crap accumulated around the channel and rotted it out. The PO had then jammed a whole bunch of silicone in there, which had the effect of trapping water and causing it to rot even more. The only way to fix it is to remove the rear window trim, the rear window, and then repair the channel. This required major cutting, welding, and paint. If you have a vinyl top, you might be able to avoid the paint, but you'd most likely need a new top. When I had this done 12 years ago, I found a budget local guy, and it still cost me ~$1,500 as part of a larger project.

Copy of IMG_3504.JPG
 

Mikie17

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It’s just surface rust on the rear sides but as you can see there’s major rust on the bottom channel of the window and up inside underneath the top trunk How would this be fixed?
 

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Intragration

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It's hard to tell from the pictures, but it looks like this area is receiving exposure to the elements. My guess is that the rear window channel is leaking, and the water is dripping in this area under the dutchman panel. This particular rust that you show...it only happened and is getting worse because it's continuing to see moisture. Fix the window channel problem (if that is in fact the problem) and this area becomes somewhat of a non-issue. It's not really going to continue to rust and get worse if the exposure to moisture is eliminated. If you really want this rust fixed, you'd need to either cut it out and weld in patches, or get a new piece out of a different car and weld it in. I personally wouldn't worry too much about the pictured rust, as long as the problem that caused it in the first place has been fixed.
 

Intragration

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Put another way, if you fix this rust you show in the pictures, but you DON'T fix the source of the leak, this area will just rust again.
 

Mikie17

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I tried posting these photos but Ig they didn’t but all this rust goes along side the window it could be the weather stripping or channel
 

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Intragration

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The window sealant is called butyl I believe. It's petroleum-based, and it's essentially permanent. This seal itself is not leaking. The crap that has accumulated in the channel has deteriorated the finish on the metal around the seal, and this eventually rusted through. The rust has also crept and expanded under and around the seal, to allow water through there as well. The window channel itself is not all that specialized and is hidden, so it can be fabricated from new metal. (If the rust is minor enough, it might even be able to be tacked without major cutting.) You have to take the trim off, take the window out, and the entire channel needs to be repaired. The hidden rust on the underside can be treated while it's exposed, and should not get worse once the leak is fixed.
 

Mikie17

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Or I have a cousin who does body work, I don’t interact with him like that but I know he’ll do it for me but about how much should I pay him?
 

Intragration

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As I said, I got a bargain 12 years ago along with a bunch of other work, and the rear window repair cost me around $1,500. Body work can be interesting, especially with an old car. Lots of things are different than with new cars, trim retainer posts for example. If you can find someone who will do a good job, match the paint well or do a good job on the vinyl top, you could be looking at $1,500 or way more, depending on their qualifications and rate. My suggestion would be to find a classic car specialist. They'll probably be more expensive, but you're less likely to be disappointed.
 

Intragration

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To add a little more detail, I have two individuals I use for serious body work and paint at this point. One guy does somewhat-questionable work, is cheap, easy to talk to, and will do it over and over until I'm happy. I take the cars I'm less concerned with to him. I have another guy who does show-quality perfection, and he's...not a fun guy to talk to. But there's never any need to go back for anything, because his work is perfect. He's 2-3x more expensive, and is TOTALLY worth it when I need perfection. Maybe get some local referrals from other old car buddies.
 

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